The Liberation of Metals Scraps (Vasak’s 2018 Remix)

As the title says, this was roughly from 2018, so I will be dating it as such, and using it for the 2020 Liberation of Metals remix. Enjoy? 🙂

“metal metal everywhere and not a bit won’t bite”

pistons are the motion metals, and the connected axels, to which we stand (or fall) opposed as complex carbonoids in contrast. This is the more active motion battlefield, the subtle motion battlefield would be metallic buildings and stable metallic structures, even the parts of the car that are “just sitting there” such as the frame and other holding pieces, stand in conflict to perennial plants like trees that have a tremendous amount of stable carbon (cellulose, lignin, hemicellulose)
yet buildings are an infrastructure that promote death on their skeleton form, whereas trees promote life. Buildings accrue concrete, glass, and other mostly dead purposing of chemicals.

radar first detected metals, the original enemy.

Metals, the thinner they get, sharper, but we get flimsier.

The real bullet points, writ large

The accelerations of metal, and a great many other things that are a sand paper to the living systems, slowly wearing them down, dulling them.

Hydrogen destroyed by fusion… cold.

 

The Council of Edmond – Meeting Minutes

TIME & LOCATION: The meeting took place on October 25, 2017 in an undisclosed location in Monmouth County, New Jersey.

PRESENT: Edmonds (host & facilitator), Ley, Gulian, Fred, Brian, Giovanni, Earl (note-taker), Gabriel, Geoff, Alex, Gendry (alias), Brendan, and Samantha (“uninvited”)

0) The meeting began with Edmonds reading the following excerpt/handout:

‘You will hear today all that you need in order to understand the purposes of the Enemy. There is naught that you can do, other than to resist, with hope or without it. But you do not stand alone. You will learn that your trouble is but part of the trouble of all the western world. The Ring! What shall we do with the Ring? That is the doom that we must deem.

‘That is the purpose for which you are called hither. Called, I say, though I have not called you to me, strangers from distant lands. You have come and are here met, in this very nick of time, by chance as it may seem. Yet it is not so. Believe rather that it is so ordered that we, who sit here, and none others, must now find counsel for the peril of the world.

‘Now, therefore, things shall be openly spoken that have been hidden from all but a few until this day.’

Part A – Worldly, Historical, and Future Problems

1) Sub-topic 1 – Oligarchy (introduced by Giovanni). The powerful were believed to be a major problem by all, but questions of what power is and where they got it (are hierarchies ontologically real) were discussed. Critical commentary from several members, and a salient question was if oligarchy is responsible primarily for the world’s ills, or if something systemic and infrastructural is more to blame.  The idea summarized that oligarchs themselves are still in the prison: “Property and money are the prison, the oligarchs merely the current prison guards.”

2) Sub-topic 2 – Racism (introduced by Earl). Racism is a major problem, yet after discussion it was believed to be a symptomatic resultant of other oppressions that has only become foundational to the racists’ identities as culturally learned. Also the concept of white privilege was downplayed in favor of a new understanding of “colored disprivilege”. Further, a unique struggle not normally elaborated in acceptable discourse was discussed, namely that many whites (WASPs) have deep community (and previously resource) deficits that explain the roots of their aggressive individual and national policies throughout history. Further discussion was tabled to allow for the next sub-topic which grew from the racism discussion.

3) Sub-topic 3 – Imperialism (introduced by Gabe). Lenin’s work on imperialism was averred to, and the notion of capitalism as a disease that will inevitably keep spreading, if allowed, was generally agreed to. Along these lines, it was posited that imperialism is not just the “macro” taking over of resources on other continents, or planets (an eventuality?), but also should include the control of biological life at the cellular (genetic modification) and even down to the quantum control of sub-atomic particles (accelerators and quantum computing). Imperialism comes from an internal weakness on the part of the oppressor, so despite its widespread devastation, it is still symptomatic in its origins.

4) Sub-topic 4 – Suburban clusterfuck (introduced by Edmonds). Credit was given to James Howard Kunstler as a general introducer of the suburban perils (physical and psychological) as well as the coiner of the term, though none were sure if that was truly the case. Dependence on electrical grids, food and resource supply chains, automation (tabled), depression, sameness versus difference grew out of this discussion. Also, cities as death-traps for a variety of similar reasons of fragility, but also violating and perverting to an extreme degree Dunbar’s number. There were a plenitude of apocalyptic scenarios put forth which one member pointed out was ironic to be coming from such a mundane thing as suburbia.

5) Sub-topic 5 – Civilization(S) (introduced by Gendry). The discussion of urban and suburban woes naturally went to civilization-as-a-whole (initially), where problems of sedentism were expounded upon. But there were some ardent defenses of sedentism, with references to scholarly work that said not all sedentary people in early history and pre-history needed to create ecologically destructive agricultural practices. It was pointed out that it was in fact nomadic people that often became the conquerors, but this idea was then problematized by the fact that most nomadic people were not “imperialistic” like this and that imperialism stemmed from intrinsic weaknesses in relation to a given land, especially were that land already occupied and “distorted” by sedentism. There was agreement that the effects of civilization to create climate change, by way of soil erosion and poor/ignorant land management, including domestication of animals and crops for mono-cropping, were huge factors in causing desertification and atmospheric carbon increases.

6) Sub-topic 6 – Propaganda (introduced by Alex). It was agreed that the powerful have always utilized multiple methods to coerce people, often resorting to misinformation instead of overt violence (for example through exaggeration or outright lying). Western representative democracy was forwarded as a prime, ongoing example of propaganda: representative democracy is when oligarchs take up acting. Propaganda was found to be a deep cultural force that goes beyond just social class, governmental, and economic oppression, but it can be found in parallel in all sorts of everyday relationships where manipulation is consciously or unconsciously utilized. The question to see if it’s pre-civilized went in to a discussion of other animals such as birds, namely peacocks, to know if the bright feathers males flaunted were representative of their virility or a sapping of their energy for the sake of a veneer; the oily sheen on a dog’s coat or even on a leafy plant were mentioned, too. Contemporary propaganda was agreed to be holistically inefficient, mentally enervating, and a parasitical draw on available resources that could be used elsewhere, except when it was itself highly artistic and its own end regardless of the distorted representation for another end.

7) Sub-topic 7 – Identity-Politics (introduced by Gabe). There was no consensus on whether or not identity politics was itself a problem or representative of many problems existing and a means to counter them. A conciliatory approach offered by one of the members on how to approach identity politics was that it depended on what the unifying identity was, and if it was a pre-existing alienated group defined by the oppressor, or an identity created by a loose group of marginalized (and not-so-marginalized) people to vent, gain attention, and/or seize power. The reconcilement centered on the idea that even if the problems for which the identity-based group was created were not solved, and even if new problems were created by the social group rising from their challenges, there often resulted positive internal community growth that filled the vacuum, and the issue(s) themselves could be viewed at the least as a vehicle to unite people in to community which they were all lacking. The discussion then became more genealogical in how identity politics ever arose, and then was tabled.

7a) 15 minute break followed by a 5 minute quiet reflection on the topics covered so far, and then a singular generation of a list of problems not yet covered so far.

8) Sub-topic 8 – Legality (introduced by Brendan). Brendan started off saying that law trials are not about justice, they are a sport between highly paid professionals who compete at the onlookers expense. This served as a beginning to the discussion which went quite deeper in to evaluations of what legality really is. It was put forth that more often than not that even were laws able to not contradict and negate other laws (for which biased and unbalanced lawyers and judges were paid to sort out), that the human channeling of energy in to legal systems over the millennia, regardless of the cohesion and coherence of the justice system, has been synonymous with greater and greater purging from the individual person an innate sense of vigilance and justice. Laws are the blindspot of justice, and now with an entire legal class, the laws have divorced everyday sense of ethics, which is in effect how the human disease can unleash itself on the Earth without any self-checks or thoughts to do so. Environmental stewardship was such an example of innate human consciousness that it needed to linguistic codification, and yet it has now taken centuries of destruction of the environment on the part of humans to finally render it in to law, and it is still ineffectual because it is contradicted by the rights of governments and individuals (corporations namely) to rape the land. Justice is a terribly long walk of the pen, with countless victims written over along the way; or is it?

9) Sub-topic 9 – Industrialization/Technology/Globalization (introduced by Brian). Though the topic of industrialization seems to have been overlapped with already in the sub-topics of imperialism and civilization, the discussion was qualified for additional insights that Brian, and then others following him, surfaced. Firstly, because many non-primitivist socialist-utopian affinities were present in group members, it was important that a discussion around the role of technology be had, presuming that the technology was in the hands of, for example, a gift-economy or worker-run city whereby it wasn’t used for individual profit, but for social progress. Industrialism for human use at the hands of worker-councils should be a good thing, if it could be done ecologically. However this very question became a central problem, and the open question remained on whether or not all technology or just certain technology is bad for the planet. The deep attachments to technology were admitted to on the part of all, however whether or not this was a bad thing or merely part of evolution was discussed. Some reductio ad absurdum examples entered the discussion but will not be listed in these notes. Suburbia was brought up again in this discussion but with attention to the many roads that industrialism required to connect the parts for the conquering of evermore of the land to convert it in to industrial use (if this was the type of industrialism that even a humane socialist economy would seek for). It remained an open question if industry could ever reach a utopian point where it was not destructive to any living things as was aspired to (presumably) in the Soviet Union.

10) Sub-topic 10 – Money (introduced by Fred). A discussion of mediation in general that first focused on money, but expanded to particularly the quantification and reification of consumer goods and services so that they might be translated in to monetary quantities, and the chafing down of all things to fit in to the cash nexus or other human categories of thought, and physicalitys that conformed with artifices. The social losses incurred when money was given legitimacy were discussed, and how other/older forms of kinship and resource sharing were weeded out; a huge quantity of money middle-men that emerged to bureaucratically manipulate it giving way eventually to huge “money making” institutions; money is the clothes that imperialists are dressed in. Also, intrinsic problems of money will always exist, it was argued even were there benevolent money-managers (such as automated robots, tabled for later).

11) Sub-topic 11 – Science (introduced by Geoff). The science sub-topic discussion continued right where industrialism and money left off, but quickly mixed in philosophical ideas revolving around what reification really is and if it’s the method of science to do so (dissecting and then analyzing). What is science really and if is used as a term so broadly is it really multiple things conflated together? Is it just mere empirical observation? How does science choose its objects and what mereological assumptions does it make? Representationalism (and misrepresentation) are cultural and shifting far more than they are objective, and yet this is the way of science that constantly disproves itself, meaning it is a long history of being wrong, outside of the aspect of science that is the humble recording of observations and drawing minute conclusions. Thomas Kuhn was indicated though his name couldn’t be remembered at the time. Specific examples of science’s direct impact were brought up. Science enabled nuclear power (or was it the human imagination, and science shouldn’t be given deistic agency?), and now in peace time there are black-holes created routinely with great hubris, and great danger. Will modified organisms really be helpful in evolving the planet forward, or are they a murder of life with life’s own corpse? Discussion went further, into the imperialism of knowledge, the unceasing human quest to know things, that has been conflated with evolution of the species; it has led to a great weakening of the human because of the time investment into obsessing about knowledge piles to the loss of in-body time that humans need. The poor posture overweight cubiclite was referenced.

12) Sub-topic 12 – Science/Fiction (introduced as “Artificial Intelligence” by Giovanni). Edmonds chose to title it Science/Fiction for writing purposes and to include a broader discussion beyond artificial intelligence. Immediately too the question was injected of if artificial intelligence can even attain artificial consciousness, for machines are not self-healing and evolving organically and are uncontained by programming, yet computers seem to have this fundamental restraint. If artificial intelligence is created (presumably organically and not electronically), or even if machines advanced enough to be almost autonomous and controlled by the oligarchy entirely, they would be deadly to all humans that didn’t serve some purpose. Ley had lots of background in science fiction and had written an unpublished essay titled “Fictional Today, Experimental Tomorrow: The Real Dangers Of Science Fiction” where he argued that the human imagination was very important to defend us against most crises, which are preventable if we take their precursors in our imagination (this in parallel to using intuition to sense the future). However, Ley said imaginations can conjure futures that are radically different yet could then be realized by a determined people that imprison the present for their own twisting purposes. Science fiction does just this, as it provides enough of a blueprint (it seizes the imagination) that we then force (engineer) the present in to. Engineers are not neutral actors in all of this but actively decide which of a myriad of directions reality will go in. Comedian Bill Burr’s routine on Steve Jobs was mentioned as exemplary of this arbitrarity.

Further, and perhaps most dangerously, science fiction goes to normalize dystopian situations and neutralize our critical ethics faculties to something that would otherwise be quite shocking. The “saw this in a movie” effect is widespread and has allowed great leaps in perversion and destruction on the part of governments and corporations. The abnormal is so quickly made normal and digestible through movies (again, propaganda)

13) Sub-topic 13 – Health (introduced by Gulian). Gulian confessed he had been thinking about this topic all along because of the variety of food options we all were partaking in, some very healthy and some very poor food choices “winter storage foods built for sieges”. Lack of sunlight exposure and the work of Stephanie Seneff were asked to be included in these notes, too, which he mentioned briefly but self-tabled. He took a show of hands to point out who of us were fading during this second half of the meeting, and who was still going strong. He did this from a standing position, standing being something only he and Edmonds did during the meeting that he pointed out. He went on to say how adversely affected modern human health is by all the previous sub-topics we had previously listed, and a vicious feedback loop ties them all together. And it was agreed that if our own health was not managed in preventative ways not dependent on the parasitical medical-industrial complex, we could not hope to fight these other issues. But questions of how to do this, and what makes a person feel healthy and whole beyond merely eating healthy and exercising bodily and spiritually were discussed. Samantha, a dweller in the location of the meeting who is a practicing nutritionist, happened to overhear the discussion and offered some practical tips for all of us including intermittent fasting, using a salt-water infused water drink called “sole”, and sleeping at the same time every night. The need to express our creative energy was brought up as a health initiative, particularly sexual contact and release, and also very important skin contact such as cuddling.

14) Sub-topic 14 – Sexism (introduced by Samantha) – This meeting, as Samantha pointed out and others admitted noticing earlier, didn’t formerly include one women, or one openly LGBTQQ person (as far as she knew). How could the world’s problems hope to be alleviated and turned without the voices of the other? There was discussion of how to go about including others who they didn’t happen to be acquainted with, and how to not make it merely in to a tokenizing inclusion, as would be the case with several of the member’s wives. Also the assumption that all those who identify somewhere in the LGBTQQ spectrum, or too as straight women, feel oppressed, and would have any interest in taking on the task of evaluating the world’s problems and then saving the world. Rights to be nude entered the discussion, and one member, followed by two others, stripped for effect and to re-normalize the surroundings.

15) Sub-topic 15 – The Over-looked “ism” (introduced by Edmonds). Edmonds confided that this he was hoping to end with, in what he saw as an overarching problem not yet clearly defined or considered. There were a few headings under which the idea might be introduced, and he chose it under it’s negative terming as an ism, namely ageism. He felt that the fight against ageism opened itself to a proactive fight rather than a reactive and defensive fight, as has been and would be the case when fighting most of the other causes of global death and oppression (because they were fighting to defend something that enabled a different version of rot to dwindle within. Fighting for the youth to continue is what life inevitably had always done, and not through destruction but creation and cultivation. It was a fight far beyond mere cultural contrivance, but in line and with momentum coming deep from instincts and the whole trajectory of life on Earth. The Earth had chosen billions of years ago to have reproduction as the part of how life continues, and humans had now severely interrupted this. Ageism against the youth was discussed and agreed to as a major issue to cap off the problem listing phase. Another member pointed out that the humanizing of the event as an ism against humans might fail to include what was really the fight for life on the planet, whether animal, plant, fungi, or other. The sixth mass extinction if allowed to continue would eventually preclude fights against any other of the problems, and yet solve many of the human-made ills on the Earth, but for few species left to benefit from.

Part B – World Saving, History Redeeming, and Future Freeing

It was agreed upon that this portion of the meeting would be extremely brief and focus upon devising solutions for one of the single problems listed. To the surprise of all, one member put forth a motion, and then another seconded it. Including this process was quite spontaneous, and to Edmonds’s delight it was in favor of the problem just elucidated. “For the children!” said Alex with a fist raised, and then all raised their fists and said it again. Alex then shared powerfully that we ought to not focus on the Enemy, referring to the LOTR reading where “the Enemy” was underlined, but on the friends. Giovanni then ventured that restoration permaculture is the best way to be “pro-life” wherever anyone of any status and means happened to find themselves. He shared a specific idea he had been contemplating on how to make the “Water Is Life” movement more proactive using permaculture. Essentially his idea was that instead of just defending by use of laws and pleading, westerners or indigenous peoples should actively make new sources of water and “green the desert” through swales and pond creations to inspire people to create once again what had been lost. All the members agreed to go and research permaculture, and Fred, also a permaculturalist, shared that he would work to revive the “Permaculture Campaign” that he had launched earlier that year and had let fall to the wayside. The meeting was closed with the idea that they would meet again in the future after having chewed on and researched what was discussed (and reviewing this document), coming up with any proactive campaigns that might be suitable. A last comment and commitment was by Gendry who had shared that he was already looking at intentional communities to visit on IC.org, and that another best thing to do for the future generations was to provide them with the option to be part of a tribe. Several others thought it was a good idea and told him to forward information to their emails and that an intentional community exploration sub-committee should exist alongside the permaculture researching.

So concludes the minutes on the Council of Edmond, October 25, 2017, 100 years after the Russian Revolution, and 1001 years before the Council of Elrond, in the Third Age of this world.

The Liberation Of Metals

“metals groove to their rigid dance, while we sit watching, entranced”

We are normalized to what is a very anomalous geographical feature, namely the high quantity of large elemental metals and metal-dominated alloys. The most striking image I can think to provide you is gazing upon a skyscraper under construction with countless tons of steel “I-beams” conquering the airspace, or a suspension bridge donning voluminous quantities vast metallic twine. These peculiar purities of structural metal, which we can go and see without much trouble (unless we are in an unmantamed jungle), were never available to strike our ancestors’s perceptions. In the past—geographically speaking—most metals were more dispersed and far less in quantity at the crustal surface and atmospheric level, intermingled as they were with other chemicals and compounds where they served an important role but in relatively minute presence. The metals circulating in human cultural activity today, however, used to mostly be below our visibility and buried underneath the soil level, and deeper still. At present, metals exist not just alongside us at a much higher rate and in a much purer form, they also exist within us: our bodily tissues and organs have quantities of metals and metallic compounds that are generally too high (thus the high rates of autism and many, many other modern health conditions). The corollary to the high presence of newer metals is that other, particular metals (e.g. zinc) that have an important symbiosis with organisms may exist within us at lower levels than necessary, as they are out-dueled by other, competing metals (e.g. copper; other organically competitive metals are molybdenum and tungsten, selenium and mercury, and more that I’m just learning about).

Metals—before human adventures into bogs, mining, and sifting river sediment—would be unearthed only by cataclysmic earthen collisions with asteroids (and other spatial bodies); a large impact would stir the earthen pot, adding some fresh deposits of metals and unearthing others more accustomed to the depths. These days, the slow unceasing meteor that is human industry keeps throwing more metals up onto the surface, constantly displacing organic life that previously dwelt in the space that is now the home of the metals. These metals that so negatively affect us are the key to the process of unearthing more and more metals—it is rather tautological. We must ask ourselves: are we using metallic machinery to dig up more metals, or are the metals using us to dig up more of their friends? Does our lack of apparent control mean the metals are in control? Humans certainly have become less culturally organic and transitioned onto what could be dubbed a “metalloid path”.

Metals In Motion

From the perspective of motion—if we exclude sea waters and atmospheric winds (see note L, first paragraph)—there is a much higher ratio than there ever was before of heavier metal dominated chemical compounds than organic compounds; metals are getting plenty of exercise, but at our expense. One extreme example of where metals have been liberated very quickly into the larger atmosphere is the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe. Uranium and Plutonium, very organically destabilizing metals, have certainly restricted movement in proximity to Fukushima. The half-life of these metals quickly quarters a human life, if not “hexadecadenth-ing” it (1/16th). Perhaps the violent connotation of hexa-decimating life would not be inappropriate to convey what occurs after too much metallic-derived radiation exposure. Unfortunately, as opposed to Roman military decimation, nuclear radiation kills a far larger number of people without the strict control of human managers. Metals are in the driver’s seat driving, while humans are in the driver’s seat sitting doing little. The humans that do escape the effects of the potent metal pollution of a nuclear reactor disaster still have to deal with a restriction to their freedom of movement: DON’T GO ANYWHERE NEAR FUKUSHIMA.

Metals’ dominion of motion goes largely unnoticed, and there is a “textbook” physics experiment that goes to show how oblivious and uncritical people are of this fact. Inertial frames of reference are often initially demonstrated by physics teachers by using a particular space familiar to everyone: inside a moving vehicle. To prove that the space inside the moving car becomes it’s own inertial frame, the teacher might ask why no one ever feels wind despite undergoing high speeds; but to really bring home the point, the teacher usually gets us to think about a ball being tossed straight up in the car, and that it doesn’t fly into the rear window but returns to the thrower. Inertial frames of reference are now understood and everyone moves on, but no one thinks to ask, “are such inertial frames of reference normal to the planet’s history?” Even more to the point, no one brings up how despite the ~1,000 kilogram metal based car being hurled through (our) space with such violent force, that motion is almost completely sterile inside the car. Further troubling aspects are as follows: there is often a lot of boredom experienced on the part of the passengers; there is stale air that is frequently being cycled through a conditioner; there is light distorted and diminished by tinted, reflective windows; there is Earthen electrical isolation provided by the insulating rubber tires. The interior of modern vehicles in a large “sense” approaches sensory deprivation tanks, and surely the negative psychological effects of one forced to experience the peculiar space of a car, are ramped up as an effect. There are not voices raising this concern of why there is so little organic activity surrounding such a high energy event as a car in motion; perhaps the very energy available for thinking is cordoned off in the peculiar deprivation tanks that are our modern vehicles. Such an inertial frame of reference is an internal frame of restriction!

¿Carbon, Carbone, Cargone? 

Where in this world of metallic motion is all the carbon going as a result? The question has multiple answers, the first of which is that carbon is not going anywhere, it is staying put, by suppression. Carbon that is enmeshed in living organic compounds—i.e. humans and all of our biological friends—is stuck in place or in a restrictive inertial frame which gives the illusion of motion. As for non-human animals, migration patterns are being reduced, forcing them to become “home bodies” or faced with becoming “dead bodies” (road kill, toxic-stream kill). Areas of habitability are being reduced through desertification, a complicated process that metals at least play a partial role in.L The inclusion of higher loads of metals within these organisms is also restricting them (and killing them), with some populations of water animals known to be dying off directly because of metal pollution. Essentially, the space in which carbon based life can thrive is steadily shrinking on all fronts.

The second place that carbon is going, is into the atmosphere, resulting because of its oppression. Simplified and alienated chemicals like CO2 and other building blocks of life are released in the processes that involve moving weighty metals; if from the dust we came, to the dust we are returning—the ~400 ppm (and rising) CO2 building blocks give plenty of proof of that! Metals are a lot more massive than carbon centered lifeforms, and to move them around requires a much higher calorie diet, despite whatever efficiencies adding rubber wheels (or floating them on the ocean) to the massive unleashed metal giants fretting through our environments provides. It is towards this end that the majority of human and metal activity on earth takes place: the extraction (via drill-mining) of high potency energy found in carbon based fuels. Millions of decades of condensed and concentrated carbon energy provide the only energy combinations (along with nuclear power, perhaps) powerful enough to feed the metal-moving agenda. Does peak oil exist, and if so is it enough to stop the metal hegemony?

The third place that carbon is going in the metal driven world is into enslavement at the purposes of hardening the metal. Carbon is intentionally alloyed to iron in small amounts (less than 5%) for the service of iron to make it harder for particular industrial purposes—it is marginalized; an interesting parallel to this ratio would be the aforementioned amount of movement of metals out-competing many-fold the motion of carbon-centered life. Another telling character in this story is oxygen. Metals underground used to be plagued by oxidation issues; now, above ground, metals routinely get rid of their oxygen, steel away our carbon, all while we carbon-based life forms seem to be bodily accruing oxygen as our own rusting agent, resulting in widespread oxidative damage. Oxygen is a turncoat—reactive and shifty—if we ascribe it agency in this narrative.

Metals In Charge

The metals in motion we have to deal with are moving as fast (or faster?) than a speeding bullet or shrapnel, slowing down then to modern transportation of planes/trains/cars/elevators, and then we have standing structures like buildings and transmission towers. Both the metals in motion and those standing give off some “destructive” electromagnetic interference, especially if they are carrying an electrical charge as in the case of the transmission tower’s thick power lines. Carbon-based life has adapted the best that it can in the face of all this metal, being more cautious (looking both ways before you cross) and passive (not crossing); it’s reminiscent of the Artilleryman describing humans adapting to Martians in The War of the Worlds (pages 248-251). One modern social habit that displays this passivity and awkwardness that people feel in association with the rigid spaces modern building technologies allow us is the over-utterance of “sorry”. It’s not completely a matter that “sorry” has changed meaning—though that is sometimes the case—but that some people are generally sorry for being in the way of a smooth flow of traffic. Whether it’s crossing the street in a very apologetic manner, waving and prostrating oneself to the massive car that is letting you walk pass, and seeming overly grateful that such a giant beast would have the kindness of heart to let you as a mere pedestrian cross first; or someone exiting a narrow corridor as another person is entering and saying “sorry” for being a body block to the other person’s continuing through the corridor uninterrupted. There is such shame many of us feel in our very existence, that we are somehow awkward and uncomely beings that are exceptions to the rule and need to be accompanied with constant apology.

Unfortunately, the latent content of our zeitgeist is that we’ve been conquered irreparably by metals (or computer technology, which is of the same logical blend) and there is no option to escape. In an inverted way to how Napoleon supposedly used language differences to use his conquered people to fight for him and not unite against him, metals have us all speaking their same language—which I think would be a type of binary—so that we are easily decoded. Words that could unite organic life to rebel against metallic life are not just marginalized from our typical linguistic use, they are being erased entirely as if they never had existed. Nuspeak—and universal efforts to have 100% literacy, including digital—is the cage that needs no prison guard because the prefrontal cortex is so effectively segregated from the other thinking regions. We are frequently unable to think, and thus communicate, the biological problems we are increasingly imposing on ourselves. All of these electric, metal-based infrastructured systems are regarded as essential to life—increasingly understood to be a priori to it—and so we put all our hope into its continuance and invest in its endurance, but all to our detriment.

There is still a warm, humid darkness at the end of The Enlightenment tunnel; sacred spaces un-scarred and less chronically scared are still available to those who want to escape the everyday metallurgy. One can choose to leave the metal majoritarian areas of contrived macro-climates in opting for a micro-climate where life grows and finds the healthiest niches. It is safer to be a freer life form in such a micro-climate, such as a commune where fast paced metal/electrical life is kept to a minimum (something which I recommend!). For those of us who want to battle (and succeed) right where we are: we are more complex than the metal creations we’ve unleashed, despite our very real depletion, and we do have biological systems within us and around us that are allies. The edible dandelions that grow on an untreated lawn are dynamic accumulators which restore soil health and mine up metals and other minerals in their proper balanced form; they can do this in some of the most abused landscapes and are vitality’s pioneers. We can build up oxytocin concentrations in our body by physically connecting with our species in a variety of different circles like massage groups (and other more and less taboo interactions) that does not include metal as a mediator. We can remove foods from our diet and undergo fasting when no healthy alternatives are present or growing. It is important to recognize that there may be much withdrawal pain (emotionally, and physically as with the Herxheimer reaction) as we detox from metal-dominated living, but it is a small price to pay compared to extinction.

THE ENDZ


Metal Appendages (Oppendices)

1) Artificial aging: Entire ages of “human development” are named after the particular metals introduced for weaponry, which is only the sharp tip of the great girth of non-metallic (mostly stone) developments early on in civilization’s history. This surely speaks to the level of worship—presumptively merited—that humans felt (and feel) in regards to metals. Metal was the cast, the clothing, the tip, to allow a widening of violence among humans whilst stone was at the core of the infrastructural project. Now, after the industrial revolution, it is metal which forms the foundational core, and stone that has been displaced as the superficial adjunct. To be literary—swords and axes only cut skin deep, but the electric grid penetrates right through us, deeper and more totally than Vlad the Impaler.
2) radar sdrawkcaB: Metals are not built to appear on the radar screens of organic life forms—there is no evolutionary precedent built in for organic life to recognize or deal with any concentration of metal that isn’t already sublimated in a properly balanced ecosystem. Bees are supposedly disturbed by radio and cellular phone frequencies, birds by that of wind turbines (ecosystem’s unfamiliarity with metal keeps the metal objectively intact for relatively long stretches of time where even common types of bacteria dare not populate on its surfaces—indeed maintenance is very efficient when the cleaning of metallic surfaces is seldom needed). The motion and concentration of metals is like a stealth bomber to our innate perceptual proclivities that we’re only able to see and recognize the potency of when we develop a “second” nature. As metal dominates more and more, nature does come second, it seems.
3) Metal as necrophiliac: The death of a carbon life form (then transitioned into a fossil fuel) is exactly what metals are dependent on for their own particular motion. Their intense motion on our Earth has heretofore in human interactions been dependent upon dead carbon matter. Their caloric needs met by gasoline ingestion is the destruction of us; it is metal feasting on the corpses of our carbonic ancestors. After digestion is finished they leave their excrement—plastics, pesticides, and other compounds—as donations to our cause of theirs. As they eat our carbonic fossilized corpses, they also have been eating us alive; if we include them as a specie-s, then we are not alone in our eating of food that is both alive and dead. The metals are borrowing on our credit, but they will stop only when we stop supplying our lives to work their hungry furnaces; until then we are just disinterestedly holocausting ourselves.
10) ¿Abiotic Carbonic Energy?: There are ongoing hypothesis that some carbon based fuels are not truly fossil fuels, as they are not in a lineage that once had some living biomass from which to be derived from. I muse here, but if this is the case could it be the higher levels of metals below the surface—using geo-pressures as a catalyst—growing their own potent source of combustible energy?
11) Yours, Mines, and Theirs: Metal mines us more surely than we mine metal. We spend our time drilling for them holding them as idols, and even as the metal idles in stagnation it drills against us, into us, with the electromagnetic force.
12) Iron Sharpens Iron: but concurrent to such sharpening iron dulls Life. We’ve betrayed the carbonic in favor of the ironic.
13) Sequestered: The concern of carbon sequestering is quite secondary to the very real need to bury metals. A great deal more could be said of this topic when I make the time to elaborate a juxtaposition between these two possibilities to heal the Earth.
20) Change versus Acceleration: We are not in an epoch of accelerating change—change is decelerating, it is dying, the becomings being beings; it is matter that is accelerating in it’s bundling and simplification to higher, larger amounts—metal here being the quintessential example. These concepts unfortunately are conflated and inverted which leads to a situation in which the problem is not appropriately intuited. Intuitive immediate imaginative senses are blocked, cobweb-ed over by destructive concepts such as “change is accelerating”. Matter is accelerating, not change!
21) We are our own key to open this lock: The liberation of Metals is the shackling of lighter non-metals. Metals are the cuffs that need no lock to imprison life. Their very concentration could have only been accomplished by our previously subtle intuitive abilities turned for destructive uses—we humans traded our synthetic imaginations for the pastime of analysis, and we project outwards the cutting logic that has us turning disparate metals into unified weapons against our own kind, reflective steel purified to great degrees for precise surgical uses. Mirroring our adoption of analysis as our inner monologue has been the ability to create extremely hot controlled temperatures as well as those extremely cold, this within small spaces where the general laws of thermodynamics are bracketed by metals and their allies. Metals could only have grown and gathered in such stature by our own fiddling with rapidly distinct and changing heats that separate and recombine old compounds into new ones, never before known to the Earthen context.

Notes

L The role that metals play in desertification could possibly be analyzed to be twofold, though more or fewer actual reasons may exist beyond the scope of the author. The first role is what has been mentioned in many places already in this essay, namely that metals in motion reduce organisms’ ability to be as dynamically involved in the environment, which might be a definition for a desert. To flesh this out a little more, consider how a lot of wind erosion on a mountain top keeps trees from growing there, but so too it could be said that a lot of trees growing there could keep down the wind erosion. Either way, the degree to which there is the homogeneous motion of larger, less subtle forces—a constant drying western gale force wind that acts as one large rigid force as opposed to a light humid breeze that dances between trees in no particular direction—is the degree to which smaller more complex developments are precluded. Along with the great currents of air that are eroding subtle areas that used to be rich with plant and fungal biomass, so too are greater currents of ocean water playing a role in eroding oceanic life, especially at the coasts where it used to be the greatest. Zooming way out, here’s a galactic example of the same phenomenon: think of a galaxy where large asteroids, planets, and even stars are constantly colliding and causing large violent impacts whereby thermal dynamic changes are undergoing huge changes in the local contexts; these large bodies gathering elemental matter and making it act roughly uniform (think of a giant gaseous planet with little chemical complexity) will give no chance to allowing any life to endure, whether carbon based or any other type. The celestial bodies interacting are themselves, perhaps, the lifeforms; however, it is a big waste of the smaller potentials within them: the variety of chemical elements from which they have pulled by gravity into strict enslavement could make such a richer tapestry, just as a one building with LEGO blocks can make something far more interesting than one can with DUPLO blocks.

The second role that liberated metals play in contributing to desertification is the way that their temperature fluctuations mimic that of a desert. Metals heat quickly with exposure to a thermal energy source, but also cool quickly when that energy source is removed (think of a pan being heated by a flame). This is the same process that goes on in a desert, whereby the sun’s thermal energy warms it during the day, but then when the sun sets the desert becomes very cool very quickly. Our particular earthly forms of life, at least, do best when under a relatively constant thermodynamic heat. This regularized temperature that our life needs is emblematic of the modalities of a life force: harmonization occurring through a common interactive vibrational level. The violent swings in temperature prevent life from spreading those deepening complex bonds because harmony is constantly being shattered/interrupted. Large concentrations of metals at the crustal surface are sure to exacerbate these swings in temperature, and so too will continue to diminish the global biomass which is so critical in regulating temperatures to foster additional layers of life.

ZThe beginnings—thankfully we haven’t reached an end, or else I would not be typing and you would not be reading. May this lore of metals help dissuade us from the lure of metals.


Some Affinitive Posts:

Desertification

Desertification (As Earth’s Subtleties Are Extincted)L

The role that metals play in desertification could possibly be analyzed to be twofold, though more or fewer actual reasons may exist beyond the scope of the author. The first role is what has been mentioned in many places already in this essay, namely that metals in motion reduce organisms’ ability to be as dynamically involved in the environment, which might be a definition for a desert. To flesh this out a little more, consider how a lot of wind erosion on a mountain top keeps trees from growing there, but so too it could be said that a lot of trees growing there could keep down the wind erosion. Either way, the degree to which there is the homogenous motion of larger, less subtle forces—a constant drying western gale force wind that acts as one large rigid force as opposed to a light humid breeze that dances between trees in no particular direction—is the degree to which smaller more complex developments is precluded. Along with the great currents of air that are eroding subtle areas that used to be rich with plant and fungal biomass, so too are greater currents of ocean water playing a role in eroding oceanic life, especially at the coasts where it used to be the greatest. To give a galactic example: think of a galaxy where planets large asteroids, planets, and even stars are constantly colliding and causing large violent impacts whereby thermal dynamic changes are undergoing huge changes in the local contexts; these large bodies gathering elemental matter and making it act roughly uniform (think of a giant gaseous planet with little chemical complexity) will give no chance to allowing any life to endure, whether carbon based or any other type. The celestial bodies interacting are themselves, perhaps, the lifeforms; however, it is a big waste of the smaller potentials within them: the variety of chemical elements from which they have pulled by gravity into strict enslavement could make such a richer tapestry, just as a one building with LEGO blocks can make something far more interesting than one can with DUPLO blocks.

The second role that liberated metals play in contributing to desertification is the way their temperature fluctuations mimic that of a desert. Metals heat quickly with exposure to a thermal energy source, but also cool quickly when that energy source is removed (think of a pan being heated by a flame). This is the same process as goes on in a desert, whereby the sun’s thermal energy warms it during the day, but then when the sun sets the desert becomes very cool very quickly. Our particular earthly forms of life, at least, do best when under a relatively constant thermodynamic heat. This regularized temperature that our life needs is emblematic of the modalities of a life force: harmonization occurring through a common interactive vibrational level. The violent swings in temperature prevent life from spreading those deepening complex bonds because harmony is constantly being shattered/interrupted. Large concentrations of metals at the crustal surface are sure to exacerbate these swings in temperature, and so too will continue to diminish the global biomass which is so critical in regulating temperatures to foster additional layers of life.


Notes:

LThis publication is a footnote to a larger piece I’ve been compiling, “The Liberation Of Metals” and I thought it could stand on it’s own as a post. The upcoming ”’Liberation of Metals is about the role of the large quantities of metals we’ve introduced to our crustal surface, and how these metals are destroying organic connectivity, of which this note published here was an important facet that I struggled to fit within the linear narrative stricture. There’s even more I would’ve liked to publish in here about the ramifications of human simplifying/analytic interactions with our environment, that leads to such destructions as those wrought by industrial mono-crop farming methods. There are so many other things that we engage in that I probably am so normalized to that I don’t see. We are employing such an effort to average everything into a uniformity where the peaks and valleys of vital life are smoothed into a digital conformity. The “treatment” of emotions is another such example, where the dips and dives, highs and aspirations of a mood wave are sought to be controlled, averaged out, to a constant state of looking at things from a cool distance. We are estranged from our own bodily functionings by a rolling pin of pills. The blandness of eroding cannot be tasted for the taste buds are included in the wasting away…

Corporate Campus Crimes

Corporate Campus Crimes2

Fortunately or unfortunately, I live in proximity to several corporate headquarters, and have had to include their campuses to get in a variable trek for my lengthy dog walkings. The experience from these trespasses has afforded me to develop a fledgling academic field by the name of Comparative Corporate Campus Ruminations. I say trespass, but from my perspective there is certainly also an impingement on me—and other lives much bigger than mine—which I suppose is the prime mover behind this post’s existence. So far all the walks have been very tranquil, whether on a weekday morning or a weekend evening. The natural sounds from crickets and locusts emanate from the tree packed margins—the “wild space” separating one corporate kingdom from its neighbor. Tree packed? It’s a relative term contrasted against the spacious, breathable, un-claustrophobic lawns occasioned by small tree islands. The scope of corporate lawns alone is an advertisement that these corporations are economy-driving job creators: think about how much mowing there is to benefit the backbone landscaping industry.

Tranquilized Environments: No More Kidding?

A third,

A third, “reserve” parking lot, thought what it’s reserving I can’t say. I think they couldn’t pass up on a “build two, get the third free” deal.

Why should I complain about something so pleasant, like having a free visit to a country club1? Even the parking is free, that is if you can find a spot. So much of the landscape that isn’t lawn is taken up by an assortment of giant asphalt solar tarps, where to park the car? These passive solar heaters must have been installed to counter the air conditioning system that must make things inside oppressively cold. One good thing then, at least, is that the people that work inside the large five story building must be forced to walk through the greened campus from wherever they park their cars, or where public transportation drops them off. There are, of course, the occasional rebels that decide to park on the asphalt solar tarps, but I’m sure corporations have a means of dealing with people who break their rule(s), such as placing the offender in a south-facing corner office where they are forced to see a blue-tinted sunny landscape all day long, as opposed to a choice cubicle with four generic walls to keep them company.

“Then I guess we don't have to worry about finding people in that water.” “Or leeches!” “What's the difference?”

“Then I guess we don’t have to worry about finding people in that water.”
“Or leeches!”
“What’s the difference?”

Changing Registers: No More Kidding!

In witness to overwhelming tragedy humans will sometimes make light of things to obscure the horror, as I have attempted above. However, I would like now to shine light on this particular tragedy because the voice of the ecosystem, which humans are generally deaf to, has now been eternally silenced. It’s hard to think of the past voices of grave-less plants, fungi, and animals when things are so quiet and peaceful; for me it is a sickening peace, the peace that follows a successful genocide.

With a little imagination the crime becomes obvious: 15 acres of tons upon tons of accumulated biomass—also known as life—virtually annihilated so that a few dozen humans can spend their “productive” hours sitting in a 1/4 acre office building. The crime is not past, and it is not contained to the crime scenery. An actively intoxicated water source—such as the pond in the picture above—is sure to spread toxicity in ways that a criminal designer and property manager had no thought of, or worse, cared little about. Otherwise, maybe their thinking is much more subtle, and entirely anti-life, such as:

“If we let mosquitoes breed, we will inevitably let a whole aquaculture ecosystem spawn full of mosquito predators on up the food chain, such as fish and frogs, and that is absolutely not acceptable. We dare not let mosquitoes be part of an ecosystem that will control their numbers far more efficiently and regularly than our own chemical industry allies.”

Not all corporate campuses will attempt the false glamour of a perpetually poisoned pond. Usually they will contribute their dose of waste and toxicity by implementing a water projecting fountain and be satisfied with chemically treated lawns and deserted mulch beds. With precaution, visit one of these campuses to analyze the health threats for yourself. These crimes are actively happening around us, whether we see them or not, and whether the laws recognize them or not. Don’t hold your breath for any black-robed dishonors to rescue us and correctly judge this as a crime—we must be the judges! We must figure out what is appropriate remediation and justice before our own victimage becomes too great a burden and we need to rely on others to defend us. If not, the case studies will continue to pile up along with ecosystem carcasses.

Notes (correctly disordered):

2 – Concisely Conveying Cronnie Congressmen Cordially Condoning Corporate Campus Crimes (3C2) is an alternate title,though this article doesn’t remark on legislators and other representatives. However, this alternate title is still fitting, for it’s no lie that elected (and unelected) officials are implicitly involved in allowing particular industrial and commercial practices to go unchecked, practices ironically that they sign bills to outlaw private citizens from undertaking. I know some people are upset that corporations have the same legal status as actual people, but I think they’d be more upset if they realized corporations have a higher legal status than us. A two tier system has been created with individuals placed at the sewer level.

1 – Country Club (2C1)could be looked at as a euphemism for country clubbed down by modern industrial civilization. This relates to another, more sinister euphemism pointed out by Noam Chomsky: the Defense Department was the new title given to the War Department after WW2; the only thing that changed (other than the name) was the increasing amount of wars the USA would become involved with.

Update:

I “meme’ized” this picture:

People Treated Water

and here’s another, arguably related:

Monsanto Genocide

Vision Tunneling: Dimensional Blindness and Other Human Deficiencies Created by Modernity’s Lack of Depth

Let’s See…

This is a writing in which I wanted to investigate the possible misusing of our human visual capabilities as they would have been evolutionarily intended. A parallel critique of human misusing of memory in the modern age was published previously and fits as a nice counterpart to this piece (as does the “neolithic injuries” writing).

Consider three things, the two pictures below, and, thirdly, your active gazing at these two pictures:

drivingtunnel vision

Our two eyes, separated on our heads enough to give us subtlety different viewing angles of perception, allow a sense of three dimensional depth where both eye focuses overlap, which is typically right in front of our faces. Having this depth perception is certainly useful, and in the context of our mammalian origins is a gain that is paid for in sacrifice of a wider panoramic view that would be afforded dogs and other animals that have their eyes turned laterally outward much more.

We aren’t making use of this valuable depth perception when we are focusing our vision on framed two dimensionalized planes that we’ve been normalized to—a computer screen or a flat boring road outlined by a car windshield are just such examples. These two separate phenomena oddly share in common a great deal of black background and then depend on a great deal of light (often artificial) to illuminate; both are also oddly related to transportation, as screens transport images that aren’t otherwise readily available, and cars transport human cargo. We are under using (and misusing) our eyes and may be losing visual functionality (through eye and/or brain atrophy) if they aren’t getting enough proper three dimensional exposure.

The modern world has two dimensionalized so many of the visual encounters we habitually have, and that might be having profound effects on our eyes, but also on our larger interactions with the world. We may be unthoughtfully seeking to make more of the physical world fit in with this simplified relation to visual space, because we would literally have headaches or other discomforts were we to accept and cultivate more dynamic three dimensionalized space. Perhaps we are even becoming three dimensionally blind? This two dimensionality may “stimulate sleepiness” (an oxymoron?), as a two dimensionality is encountered naturally during sleep when our eyes are resting to a darkened eyelid. Or one of the many inversions of this could be true: this could be a contributing factor to widespread insomnia epidemics due to not having gotten enough three dimensional visual exposure during our waking hours, and our brains aren’t ready to shut off when they need to.

Maybe the drawing of humans evolving more kyphotic (hunch backing) needs to include a single cyclops eye… Homer was prophetic!

gamerEvolution

*I was going to entitle this “The Planed Middle And The Voluminous Borders” as a way of describing the framed picturesque view of the world many of us might be artificially accustomed to, but I thought that might hint (and confound) towards a metaphorical exposé about how marginalized radicals at the margins of society are actually more dynamic and more alive. I welcome you to take your mind there and use this as a leaping off point, for that is an exciting use of thought to tackle the new levels of mediocrity that make our world less livable, literally in every sense.

The City Is Dead, And We Have Killed Him

the fuck who tower

From across the river, you see a big defiant middle finger as a projection of power, but what purposes does the sky raper serve? Like most erections, this one will end up fucking itself. Despite its high rising edifices, the city is not a place that elevates—it is a place where humans are on the same point of the food chain as the pigeons. Resources the world over zoom in to serve only one herd animal: the human mono-crop.

Decadence draws many curious opportunists in—the conception of a ground zero has a longer history/future and a wider geography than 9/11 highlighted—the tourist sites are only different in degree, they share in kind their neglect for human needs to the detriment of human wants. As we exit into the Maninhattanable moonscape through the hollow tunnel, and behold the harsh reality of the people funnels—grids of iron and asphalt—we are awestruck by the disorderly attempts that successfully contain (for the moment) a great many paradoxes. Freedom of movement is deterred and depth of thought is simultaneously propelled and stifled by the speedy whirring of bodies biological and mechanical. Artists don’t come here, they are here grown in Life’s defiance and tragically come to represent in their deformalism and twisted flesh the misappropriation of the world’s previously natural resources.

Punishments to your sense of smell pull up questionable philosophical notions such as: “animals who live in sewage learn to live with the taste” and “if you belittle yourself enough you get to experience the greatness of the unexceptional” while your bedrock idioms like “tattoos aren’t covering up the banality, they are the banality” are thrown into doubt. Your brain is being weighed down by the layers of oppression that displace the oxygen, and you come to understand that only moon worshipers who like alternate levels of gravity are drawn in, while others leave, or flea.

Decadence draws many curious opportunists in—the conception of a ground zero has a longer history/future and a wider geography than 9/11 highlighted—the tourist sites are only different in degree, they share in kind their neglect for human needs to the detriment of human wants. As we exit into the Maninhattanable moonscape through the hollow tunnel, and behold the harsh reality of the people funnels—grids of iron and asphalt—we are awestruck by the disorderly attempts that successfully contain (for the moment) a great many paradoxes. Punishments to your sense of smell pull up questionable philosophical notions such as: “animals who live in sewage learn to live with the taste” and “if you belittle yourself enough you get to experience the greatness of the unexceptional” while your bedrock idioms like “tattoos aren’t covering up the banality, they are the banality” are thrown into doubt. Your brain is being weighed down by the layers of oppression that displace the oxygen, and you come to understand that only moon worshipers who like alternate levels of gravity are drawn in, while others leave, or flea.

This city is dying, in its final throes—he is left in a vegetative state without any vegetation. The central park is at the very margins: an escape not a destination, only an appendix to a machine, but a lung to a living human. This concrete desert dry-ages bodies rapidly, putting on years at the expense of crystallizing wisdom. Drugs flourish here not because of their availability, but because of their need. Bipolar condition is born and embodied here, for at the flip of a switch unimaginable depression will stamp out the maniacal oppression. In Times Square where the photons omit the truth by emission—and hope only flickers and dims—the colors are unable to hide the gray wasteland: the sands hidden in the glass, the plastic hidden in the complexi. The Square is a microcosm of the vast isle populated with unnatural geometric surfaces, is this what Euclid had in mind?

It is a residence trap, where tourists leave with an expensive lesson that is too dissonant to absorb for those unfortunates who permanently dwell here. Voluntary serfdom reigns though it is marketed with more enticing names. A great irony that it is the nobles in their displays of ill-gotten wealth who are the ones tying themselves to their pigeon hole purchase, for few houses are allowed. The renters may leave to be peasants elsewhere, but not those who allow the bank to bet them all in; will their equity be rolled over before they are?

On a clearer day, the epiphany rains down on you, and you ask: “What value does this city have to offer any more? What does the city provide to the world, or even its own people?” Surely American culture is so transportable and righteously ephemeral that it cannot be a single shit stain for one place to bear. This city has allowed the adjacent land to be sacked so many times—long years it was a hub for such activity—that there is no reason to sack the cursed islands themselves. There are magnitudes more flies in the shit than there are eagles, for they stay away from the foul. Even an old and balding Jeffersonian eagle, barely perceiving with its fading vision, can see from the wisdom of times past that such isles are to be avoided. The five boroughs devolve into the five deaths.

Trade your buffoon stocks for a safe place in the boon docks. Let biomass levels be your new guide to living as you purge the Dow Jones misconcept. Tunnel out of the nightmare and enter a sublime dream, and concur with your fellow travelers that a city that never sleeps is not worthy of those who are fully awake.

Strikes r Out

As the happenings from May Day get more vague, I thought it was a good idea to skip church (for me personally, it’s ‘most always a good idea to skip church) and type up a couple of thoughts.

My position that I voiced on Friday was that we radicals need to leave New York City and start communal villages where land is currently—though not indefinitely—much more affordable and much more valuable from a human perspective: “where land is not a concrete desert upheld by massive petroleum inputs”. I encountered some who were open to this idea, but many too—Trotskyists in particular were a strong presence at the gathering, distributing their own literature—who believed we need global revolution coming from a uniting of the workers of the world. I wanted to focus this post now to worker’s power, and talk more about global revolution in an upcoming post.

Workers under capitalism have historically been deemed—rightly so—to be the true power of capitalism, with one of the most obvious ways of displaying that power to themselves, and to the naĂŻve, unlearned capitalists, being the strike. Striking is very effective when workers do indeed hold the real power and can bring their masters to heel. Work has evolved into “work” in many places, and there are many unproductive underlings that could just as easily go on strike and be dismissed without so much as a reaction from their employers. On this point, it seems to me that corporations like Walmart feign a need for employees, but truly it’s a facade to further their on the ground presence. There would be no need for a scab when the limb is already dead, being propped up by invisible strings.

But maybe if ALL employees globally agreed to strike indefinitely and were able to prevent scabbing, they could shake the foundations a bit, but I am uncertain how much this would hurt the supposedly existing capitalists at the top. Important to note is when it comes to important employment such as food production, wouldn’t striking probably lash those workers at the bottom of the scale the worst? It’s difficult for the workers of the world to unite behind striking when there are such vast differences in what they would be sacrificing by putting their livelihoods on the line. Would employees who are much higher on the pay scale ever agree to identify with those at the bottom, when they are so close (at least in their minds) to the top? Further, why would people who work in some societally positive industry (it seems so hard to come up with an example) want to ally with, for example, workers in a bullet factory, when those workers being paid at all for such a ghastly profession is itself a primary question in their mind? Another difference separating workers from one another is that some have the choice of where they are employed—even if they don’t have much say over the amount of pay—while others have no choice, and so the efforts to bring coherency and a sense of fairness for a global program is multiplied immensely.

I believe striking isn’t the answer for widespread change, moreso today than ever before, largely because it is ineffective, but so too because demanding more pay (or workplace changes) for a job that ethically or practically doesn’t really warrant it, is not a justifiable arena to put efforts into. On the other hand, leaving your job to build up practical, important skills related to growing food (such as adopting the low impact permaculture philosophy), is much more in sync with creating a radical and beautiful future; a future where slaves won’t require masters, nor other slaves, and they will lose their chains…

Farming, Food, Factories, and Feminism, a Postface

Since the time of my thoughts from the Preface, my mind has continued to ruminate on the possible origins of the shift away from patriarchy. I have quite a crude hypothesis about how this situation has arisen, which looks very generally at some basic changes in the home, relationships, and lifestyles of people over the last few hundred years. I think anything we look at over this time span has to at the very least take into account the industrial revolution, if not link to it as the primary force for any noteworthy modern themes.

It’s best to begin with food, not least because it’s the most essential tangible item that humans need—after air to breath—and its production has always been an occupation of at least some members of a nation. Food production or gathering will always be first to originate in anything termed an economy, whether subsistent, traditional, market, command, or mixed; and it will always be the last occupation to fade when a civilization is ceasing to exist. This primacy of food production might be suppressed in various “high points” of civilizations, but when things start to go awry it’s importance will be reasserted—it is never far from

So even if women played a role in food production, men were usually the owners/managers/directors of the operations and the ones esteemed as the driving force of the farm. Women might cook the food and make the final essential edible meal, but this too, was only possible if the man had brought in the food: he was the real bread winner, if not the bread baker.

Up until the industrial revolution got well under way this was the main trend in societies: the relationship between males as dominant and females as subservient was codified in the immediate setting of every home, and reinforced by larger cultural traditions that put men as the only legitimate owners, dealers, shot-callers, etc.

Once industry started to literally and figuratively tower over agriculture, most men couldn’t or wouldn’t continue to be involved in farms and went on to either own factories, transport services, or work for them. Men were shuffling off to earn what was deemed more valuable—money; and giving up on what was deemed less so—food production and rural patches of land.

During all this, women were still the homemakers: preparing meals and raising the children, because it fell on them to do so. I think this is where the inflection point occurred and patriarchy began its waning. Why? Women had day-to-day evidence that what they did was in a basic biological sense absolutely essential to their families. What men were doing could not compare. It’s true that the money and the pursuit of wealth that men were undertaking had the highest amount of social legitimacy, but it wasn’t something biologically necessary the way food was, and so as men were gaining wealth from one generation to the next, they were losing ground in their visible necessity at home. Children might be told that their fathers were bringing home the bacon, but their mothers were making the rules, constantly involved in their upbringing, and going and buying the bacon AND cooking it. This shift in female self-concept probably had its greatest surges inter-generationally rather than the less likely story of singularly revolutionary females having epiphanies about their real worth; mothers might have the visibility of their value repressed by their own blinders, but their disgruntled daughters who were daily fed empirical evidence that women had the more important role in society were sure to be the ones with fires lit under them.

I don’t know if I’ve made a strong enough case for causation, but I would definitely argue that there is a strong correlation between the industrial revolution and the growing prowess of females. There are certainly other factors that played a large role in originating patriarchy to begin with, such as men taking on the role of warriors. What role soldiers being given the highest societal honor plays in modulating the waning of patriarchy is not for me to say here. I am not of the opinion that we should somehow try to engineer a way back to patriarchy either, and do not think gender relations were necessarily any “better” back then as to how they are now.

This and other details I leave for you to fill in as you will.