State Forests: what the state hasn’t grasped

State owned parks act as impenetrable rocks accidentally swallowed that cannot be digested by the predator’s intestines. The deep state isn’t so deep yet that it has been able to make full exploitative use of the entrenched non-hierarchical ecosystems of these hundreds of thousands up to millions of forested acres. The state dubs it protected land, but it has not silenced the dynamism of the land’s own making that protects and defends it from the state (for now, at least); anti-statists and anarchists alike would benefit to ruminate on this point to inform their future strategies and tactics. There are occasional forays by the state to fix or assess something in the typically mountainous regions covered in green on the surface and on the maps, but mostly, the extractive profiteering is minimal. The state’s conquest is limited to the besieged borders where the state seasonally charges fees to access these wildernesses, with permits to stay more than a single daytime day at a time; they would use tick fear as a patrol mechanism, a state ploy couched under “safety”, attempting to dissuade human access to these lands that it itself could not tame.

Contrary to the de jure legal understanding, I would argue that the borders of the protected lands are international, and the fees are a customs charge, for the land is merely enclaved by a state but not yet enslaved by it. The land is saved from state penetration perhaps by it’s lofty position (often mountainous), seated as Switzerland is in high and oblique inaccessibility. Though there are few to zero humans who permanently dwell in these places, there is plenty that we—who would choose to not be conquered by a state—can learn from such unconquered places. The protective geography that is an island in a sea of the state, is akin to ancient Greece’s geographical context, except that the unpopulated geography was the sea that made protected “islands” out of the separate city states.

While most other forests, grasslands, marshlands have been dragged in to the state’s nexus by roads and settlement—with taxation and monitoring following closely behind—these topographically asymmetrical lands have been overlooked by the state precisely because they were not, and still are not, easy to master. It is these places that frequently offer an overlook, a breath giving scenic vista, that belittles to a mere lower corner of the panorama the bedraggled exclave country that only legally includes this natural beauty. Even imperialistic statesmen such as Jefferson and Ted Roosevelt had either a steward’s empathy wrenched from them, or an awe and terror for something more dominant than they, when dealing with these vast dimensionalized lands and deciding to throw their weight behind their protection; a side question is whether they were acting as moral politicians or political moralists. Other politicians might have decided to do the same in their stead, and had they not, fierce nature might have beat them and their cadre of industry back anyways.

One of the most banal and taboo truths about human existence ties in here—a truth that puts us in our place—and it is namely that land grows people. This uncomfortable idea is ameliorated by other ideas of a plenitude of land (manifest destiny) so that raping and scorching vast stretches is okay and only localized: one cannot marry a land because there are too many parcels available, though one can have a piece of land every night and throw it away by the morning, for there are such reserves in wait. Unfortunately, such overcompensating has lead to pillaging that does not stop until it reaches little unimpressive islands of land where multiple series of squares meet—those awkward sub-acreages that modern land development is unable to systematically make more copies on. A “compromise” with nature is made with places like these alongside interstate highways where “lucky” trees remain that had the good fortune of seeding in what would be future front row seats to a twenty-four hour highway. A development corporation’s convenient public relation’s “green space” ruse disguised as a compromise with nature, is really a defeat of their instrumental rationality; but it is in these cases almost a Pyrrhic victory, for corporate and state use of rationality is so efficient in their destruction of nature.

As development corporations have trouble with little parcels of land that don’t fit in to their cookie cutter model, the state and its corporate parasites have trouble with untamed large pieces of land that would break their cookie cutters were they to try and apply them on the terrain. Life for now is very lush in these ultimate refuges of protected mountainous lands, lands which stand in a stark contrast to what industry really is all about—intentionally taming life and inadvertently (but inevitably) killing it. As of now only these strongest lands have not succumbed (been subalterrained) to the disease of state driven civilization; the state’s claws are not those of a mountain lion, they cannot easily grab such real things without great difficulty and harsh resistance, and so they only etch dividing lines in to flat plains coastal and continental that are two dimensionally digitizable. The state’s inability to grasp these places is precisely why they want to put their title on them. The state wants to contain them in language because such places actually show the limits of state power, and expose its vulnerabilities; like with so many other things, western powers linguistically co-opt what they physically cannot. Sometimes the protecting of these lands is presented as a bargaining chip in exchange for receiving a green-light to industrialize a different piece of wilderness, so in this sense they are used for political expedience. Beyond this the state’s utility of such lands is minimal, and that is a testament to what power life has in such lands, and perhaps to its future benefit if it has not deposited reserves in to fossilized coal. For us with the ability to migrate ahead of the coming metropolitan crises, skyscraping lands of tenacity with such a view would be quite a wise place to rendezvous.

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